Nick Name : Stickney MD
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Organization: Pro Ortho
Address
12911 120th Avenue NE, Suite H-210
Kirkland WA
USA

News & Events

Top Doctor 2017

August 29th, 2017

topdoc2017

The list is compiled based off the results of the Professional Research Services survey company. The company asks licensed health care practitioners in King, Pierce, Kitsap, and Snohomish counties who they would recommend to a sick loved one, allowing voters to nominate and celebrate their peers.  Dr. Stickney is a Kirkland orthopedic surgeon who offers patients both a compassionate bedside manner and high-quality medical care. With more than 20 years of experience, he performs surgeries including total hip replacement, total knee replacement, and shoulder replacement surgery. If you or a loved one is suffering from pain that’s getting in the way of a health lifestyle, consult Dr. Stickney today. 

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Why Exercise Is Best Done Outside

July 25th, 2017

outside-exerccise

It’s not secret that one of the essential components of a healthy lifestyle is exercise: from lowering the risk of physical disease or the need for joint replacement to improving your emotional and mental wellbeing, exercise is critical for longevity and a higher quality of life. However, dragging yourself to the gym isn’t always appealing, and exercise that isn’t enjoyable can become exercise that isn’t done.  A new study by the University of Innsbruck in Austria has found that the best way to exercise is by heading outdoors, whether for a vigorous walk in the woods or a casual stroll near your house. In the past, experts believed that a successful exercise regimen boiled down to two factors: intensity and duration. They figured that the secret to getting people to exercise was short, high-intensity workouts: this ensured that busy professionals weren’t strapped for time, though the intensity and effort could become off-putting.  The new study, published in PLOS One,  believes that a workout’s emphasis should instead be on duration and enjoyment. To test this, they recruited 40 volunteers from Innsbruck to complete several prolonged workouts, completing mood and anxiety tests before and after.  First, a guide took them around the surrounding mountains for a brisk, but not […]

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Like Exercising? Avoid Painkillers

July 7th, 2017

painkillers

Over-the-counter painkillers like ibuprofen and aspirin may seem a great way to alleviate soreness and pain after a particularly vigorous run or strength training session. These nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS, suppress inflammation, but recent studies published in the Emergency Medical Journal and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences have found this may not be without consequence. When combined with exercise, they may overwork the kidneys and impede the muscles’ recovery.  Unfortunately, ibuprofen and similar drugs have a long relationship with athletes, especially those engaging in more strenuous activities like marathon running. Some studies have found that more than 75% of long-distance runners rely on NSAIDS to blunt the strain of training and competitions.  A team from Stanford University began investigating the true impact of NSAIDS after it was found that those that take them may still experience muscle soreness. Essentially, NSAIDS block the production of prostaglandins, a biochemical that heads to the site of an injury and begins the process that creates pain and inflammation. To increase blood flow to the area, prostaglandins also stimulate blood vessels to dilate. NSAIDS limits the amount of prostaglandins, lessening inflammation.  The Stanford researchers studied 89 participants in multiday marathons around the globe, having them swallow either […]

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The Risk of Needing a Second Surgery

June 21st, 2017

Shot of a wife comforting her husband lying in a hospital bed

  For many patients, undergoing a total hip or knee arthroplasty may seem like the solution to joint pain and the opportunity to return to a more mobile, active lifestyle. However, the possibility of facing a secondary surgery may seem frustrating or daunting. Though the number of total hip and knee arthroplasties has risen in recent years, the incidence and prevalence of secondary surgeries isn’t well understood. A new study from the National Center for Biotechnology Information sought to examine rates of incidence. First, researchers examined groups that either had total hip arthroplasty (1,933 subjects) or total knee arthroplasty (2,139 subjects) between 1969 and 2008. Following-up after an average of 12 years from initial total hip arthroplasty, the researchers found that if a patient had a hip replacement on one sider, there was a 29% chance he or she would require a hip replacement on the other side. Those who underwent primary surgery at a younger age had a significantly high incidence of a follow-up operation. For the total knee arthroplasties, the researchers followed up after an average of 11 years. They found that those who had a knee replacement on one side had a 45% chance of requiring a knee […]

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Runners May Not Hit Stride Until 50 Years Old

June 5th, 2017

Unusual low angle back view of a group of friends jogging outdoors on a summer afternoon with sun flare

  For those who always struggled with running or were never able to commit to a consistent running routine, it turns out your best running days might still be ahead of you.New research reveals that recreational runners might not peak until they’re 50, compared to elite runners, whose performance starts to decline when they hit 35. The study, summarized in the Washington Post, examined 16 years of data from the Chicago, New York, and Boston marathons. While the fastest runners, both male and female, are between 25 and 34, those who ran competitively started to lag after 35. This is partly because when we turn 35, our muscle mass, bone density, and maximal aerobic capacity starts to decrease. In turn, we are less able to sustain high-intensity exercise and the amount we spend training might start to diminish, if we trained at all.  Elite runners, however, continue at an intense rate, drawing on their reserve energy at a much faster rate. Recreational runners, however, have more endurance because they’ve never pushed themselves as hard.  The scientists view the recreational runner’s tendency to veer away from training that’s too difficult or intense as a boon. Since his or her physiological limits haven’t been tested, […]

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There’s No Place Like Home After Surgery

May 26th, 2017

recovering-at-home

Traditionally, patients and doctors have opted for in-patient rehabilitation after total hip or total knee replacement surgery, despite the high costs. However, recent studies found that after joint replacement surgery, patients who live alone are happier and fare just as well, and possibly better, when recovering at home rather than staying at a rehab facility.  The study, published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, examined 769 patients who had undergone primary total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR). About 18% lived alone, all of whom were discharged home for outpatient rehab. Of these, almost 80% had friends or family nearby that could help provide support if necessary.  Overall, there was no significant difference in complications, pain, functional outcomes, or patient satisfaction scores between people who lived alone and those who lived with others after the surgery. However, when recovering at home instead of spending an extra night at a hospital, patients saved an average of $10,776, amounting to almost $1.5 million total. Patients recovering at home were also found to avoid other complications — such as infections and blood clots — that they might experience in a rehab facility.  “We found that patients living alone were able to […]

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Why Athletes Should Treat the Brain Like a Muscle

May 21st, 2017

brain-as-muscle

For many people, one of the most frustrating aspects of recovering from surgery or an injury is returning to their former level of performance. To overcome these hurdles, champion athletes are honing a different muscle: their brain. By sharpening their confidence, motivation, and the mind-body connection, they’re able to surpass previous limits, and, now, research suggests this is a feasible option for amateur and casual athletes facing physical obstacles.  The Washington Post rounded up tips from former Olympic athletes, psychologists, and fitness experts about the best ways to train your brain to surpass your physical limits: 1. Stay positiveIf you’re struggling with an exercise or activity after joint replacement surgery, it can be tempting to indulge in harsh self-talk. However, this can significantly impede your progress and fuel a cycle of negativity. Sports psychologist Justin Ross instead recommends writing down how you feel while exercising, when things became difficult, and how these feelings shaped your performance. Positive affirmations can also be a productive way to end an activity, reminding yourself of how much progress you’ve made and how much your body has accomplished. 2. Practice visualizationTake time to imagine what you’re going to do, whether that’s walking up a hill or […]

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Staph Infection Heightens Risk of Surgical Complications

May 8th, 2017

staph-infection

Infection after joint replacement surgery is a terrible complication that often results in subsequent surgeries with extended morbidity and rehabilitation. The possibility of infection after joint replacement depends to some degree on the patient’s immune capabilities, with the incidence ranging from 1.5 to-6% over a lifetime. One of the leading pre-operative risk factors in orthopedic patients is the presence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), or staph, on the skin or nasal cavity. Most postoperative infections after joint replacement are the result of bacteria from the patient’s skin falling into the wound during surgery. In most cases, the immune system is able to eliminate those bacteria, but staph carriers are two to ten times more likely to face infection. Pre-operative skin washing at home, skin scrubbing in the operating room, and intraoperative surgical irrigation and antibiotics help minimize this risk. Patients with staph chronically growing on their skin are at higher risk due to the aggressive nature of this bacteria and the heightened risk of wound infection. On average, 18-25% of patients will have staph on their skin chronically, and of this group, approximately 11% have a strain resistant to antibiotics. A recent study done at NYU Langone Medical Center analyzed […]

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Smoking Increases Risk of Postoperative Complications

April 10th, 2017

smoking-surgical-risk

The adverse effects of smoking upon a patient’s health have been known for decades. However, the relationship between smoking and postoperative complications for total joint arthroplasty has, until recently, been unclear. As total joint arthroplasty, a treatment for degenerative joint disease, is expected to increase in frequency in the United States, the medical community has been interested in potential risk factors, such as smoking. A recent study performed at The Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University has found definitive evidence that current smokers, as well as former smokers, are at significantly higher risk of postoperative complications after joint replacement than non-smokers. This recent research, published in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc, studied 15,264 patients who underwent 17,394 total joint arthroplasties between 2000 and 2014. The team sought to determine if smoking impacted whether or not a patient faced readmission and/or reoperation within 90 days of the first surgery. Of the patients surveyed, 9% currently smoked, 34% had formerly smoked (on average, they had quit 22 years before), and 57% were nonsmokers. While the average age of the latter group was 63.2 years, current smokers needed surgery at an average of 57.7 years. The researchers also analyzed packs smoked per […]

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PRP Injections May Be the Answer to Osteoarthritis

March 24th, 2017

PRP-and-the-knee

Although osteoarthritis is one of the most common chronic joint conditions, few nonsurgical options have shown long-term benefits. Impacting almost 27 million Americans, the disease causes pain, swelling, and mobility issues as the cartilage between joints wears down. Joint replacement surgery can provide relief once the disease has significantly progressed, but nonsurgical alternatives have only had short-term benefits. Now, a new study published in The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery suggests that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) injections could combat pain and improve joint functioning in the knee. In the past, nonsurgical treatments have included using anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid (HA) injections. While they ease discomfort, research hasn’t found that the conditions are improved over a longer length of time, necessitating total knee replacement surgery. PRP, however, might offer a new solution. PRP is blood plasma infused with platelets and contains several different growth factors. It’s been used to help alleviate pain from damaged muscles, ligaments, tendons, and joints by healing damaged cells and promote formation of cartilage repair tissue. Until now, no tests about its efficacy have been conclusive, partly due to small sample sizes. To make a more definitive claim, researchers from The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing […]

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Does Timing for Total Joint Surgery Matter?

March 8th, 2017

TJA-importance

While choosing whether or not to get total joint arthroplasty (TJA) can be a difficult and daunting decision, new research shows that delaying it may have a negative impact on postoperative outcomes. Carlos J. Lavernia, MD, who helmed a study evaluating pre- and postoperative functioning, presented his findings at the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons’ (AAHKS) annual meeting. Previously, Dr. Lavernia had studied TJA patients and found those with lower preoperative functioning had worse short-term self-reported outcomes after surgery than their higher preoperative functioning peers. Interested in examining the long-term impacts, Dr. Lavernia and his team looked at 105 patients from the original group and split them into those who were severely functionally impaired versus those who were functionally impaired. The demographics for both groups were very similar, though the first was 40% female and the latter was 73.8% female. The patients had an average age of 65 years and 54 had total hip arthroplasties while 51 had total knee arthroplasties. The mean follow-up period for all patients was 11.2 years, 13 had revision surgery, and 43 passed away. However, there did not seem to be significant differences in revision or mortality statistics between the severely functionally impaired […]

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Research Shows Benefits of “Weekend Warrior” Lifestyle

February 22nd, 2017

weekend-warriors-stickney

Working out may stave off premature death, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy to squeeze the recommended amount of exercise into your week. To combat this, the trend of “weekend warriors” has emerged: adults who condense physical activity into Saturday and Sunday. While opinions on how effective this is have been mixed, a recent study showed that the benefits for working out only one or two days are almost the same as spreading exercise throughout the week. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, looked at over 63,000 adults from the UK over 15 years, studying how long they exercised, what their exercise consisted of, and what days they exercised. The participants were grouped into two categories: inactive (those who never exercised) and sufficiently active (those who exercised for the recommended amount). The latter was split into those who worked out for three or more days a week, and those who compressed their activity into one or two days, the preference of about one out of every three American adults. The so-called “weekend warriors” were primarily male and 90% of them participated in vigorous activities like competitive cycling or team sports one day a week. Compared to the inactive group, […]

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Running Might Be Good for Your Knees After All

February 8th, 2017

running-and-knees

One of the most common myths around running is the toll it can take on your knees as you get older. Both runner and non-runners generally promote the claim that  exercise causes the cartilage around your joints to deteriorate, leading to arthritis and possibly necessitating treatment by an orthopedic surgeon. However, recent research has shown that it can actually be beneficial for your body and joints, warding off arthritis in the future. Researchers from Brigham Young University have found that running changes the joint’s biochemical environment so it functions better, longer.  Various studies have followed runners throughout lengthy periods of time to determine that they are less likely to develop osteoarthritis than their non-runner peers, but until now, why this is has only been conjecture. Experts speculated this was due to a lower body mass putting less strain on the knees, but little work had been done to isolate the impacts of running on joint health. The team at BYU studied fifteen male and female volunteers, all of whom were runners, under 30, and had no history of arthritis. The researchers collected a small amount of blood and synovial fluid, a fluid that lubricates joints, from each volunteer — the […]

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How to Prevent Winter Injuries

January 18th, 2017

stickney-winter

With winter comes the holidays, ski vacations, and long-awaited snow days. However, the ice and inclement weather can also lead to an increase in slips, falls, and injuries that may need treatment by an orthopedic surgeon. To make sure you can get the most out of the season, follow these tips from Dr. Alan S. Hilibrand to stay pain-free while hitting the slopes and spending time with family. Practice Ladder SafetyAccording to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, in 2015, nearly 566,000 Americans received a ladder-related injury and 69,000 went to the doctor or emergency room due to injuries incurred in holiday decorating. Whether you’re removing your holiday decorations or taking care of housework, prevent injury by selecting the right ladder — step stools and utility ladders for low and medium heights, extension ladders for outdoors — and never exceeding the ladder’s maximum load capacity. Make sure it doesn’t have any damage, is clean, and is set on a firm, level surface. Don’t Rush Holiday TravelUnfortunately, travel and stress can often be synonymous, and in our hurry to get to our destination or avoid lines, we might strain our backs lifting heavy luggage. In 2015, according to the CPSC, over 84,500 […]

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The Link Between Gum Disease and RA

January 12th, 2017

gum-disease-RA

 When your dentist reminds you to floss, they may be improving your orthopedic well being, along with your oral health. New research published in Science Translational Medicine discovered that the bacteria behind gum disease could also be the catalyst behind rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although about 1.3 to 1.5 million Americans suffer from RA, an autoimmune condition which causes inflammation, swelling, pain, and stiffness in the joints and can necessitate joint replacement surgery, the root cause is unknown. The relationship between gum disease and RA has been explored in the past. In 2008, a German study that appeared in the Journal of Periodontology found that people with RA are eight times more likely to develop gum disease than people without RA. In 2012, researchers discovered a correlation between tooth loss and joint inflammation — the greater the tooth loss, the greater the joint inflammation. Various other studies looked at different types of bacteria, such as that responsible for periodontal disease, to try and find a connection, though this research probes further at what specific strain of bacteria could link the two issues. An international group of researchers collected blood samples from 100 people with gum disease and 100 people with healthy […]

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The Importance of Staying Active

December 29th, 2016

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It’s no secret that incorporating physical activity into your lifestyle helps stave off heart disease and contributes to longevity while 11% of early deaths in the US can be attributed to physical inactivity. However, recent research from the University of Texas at Austin shows that getting exercise doesn’t alleviate health risks if you’re also sitting for long stretches of the day. The study, published in The American Journal of Physiology – Endocrinology and Metabolism, followed a group of young male volunteers and is one of the first to look at people who work out but spend prolonged periods sitting. The men were active — sitting for about eight hours every day while averaging 17,000 steps daily — for four days in a row and sedentary — sitting for 14 hours a day — for the following four days.  Earlier studies have shown how exercise — specifically, running for an hour — can offset high-fat, sugary meals by reducing triglycerides, or fats linked to heart disease that enter the bloodstream after eating. During the volunteer’s active days, the research team observed this phenomenon, although when the volunteers did the same workout during their sedentary days, running didn’t offset the high levels of triglycerides.  According […]

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Innovative Developments in Treating Knee Osteoarthritis

December 15th, 2016

stickney-knee-350

Knee osteoarthritis is a progressive degenerative condition. Up until recently, all treatments have been directed at ameliorating its symptoms, with no hope of stopping disease progression. However, recent trials using Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) to treat the disease, rather than just the symptoms, have had encouraging results.  PRP is concentrated plasma from your own blood that has been separated to include platelets, small blood cells that are loaded with growth factors responsible for healing cells and that help form clots so your body can repair any damage.  Many of these growth factors have been shown to promote cartilage regeneration. Although PRP has been used since 1987 to help with cell regeneration, using it to stimulate cartilage renewal is fairly new. The treatment entails drawing blood and injecting the PRP into the knee.   Two recent scientific papers reported decreased pain and improved function after PRP injections. In 2011, the Journal of Arthroscopy reported on the comparative results of injecting knees with PRP versus viscosupplementation with Hyaluronic acid, a procedure that injects a lubricating fluid into the joint. At the six-month follow-up, the PRP group had less pain. A second study in the American Journal of Sports Medicine in 2016 reported on the […]

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Running vs. Weight Lifting

November 3rd, 2016

weightlifting

Did you know that just like the rest of your body, the brain also requires physical exercise for its healthy development and functioning? According to the findings of an exceptional study recently conducted on rats, some kinds of exercise could have a larger bulking-up impact on our brains than others. For the first time ever, researchers compared head-to-head the neurological effect of various forms of exercise: running, weight-lifting and high-intensity interval training, with the astonishing findings suggesting that training hard may actually not be the best choice for the long-term health of our brains.

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AAOS Tips for Preventing Summer Injuries

June 20th, 2016

preventing summer injuries

As summer arrives, it is inevitable that we come out of our winter hibernation and become more active. Regrettably though, with more activity comes the increased chance of orthopedic injuries. In hospitals the summer season is also known as “trauma season” because adult injuries spike by 25-30%. Although not all of these injuries are orthopedic, the vast majority of these injuries fall into this category.

The most common types of summer orthopedic injuries come from: biking accidents, lawn mower mishaps, ladder incidents, swimming injuries, ATV calamities, trampoline trauma, and funky falls.

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Immune study offers treatment hope for arthritis patients

June 9th, 2016

arthritis

Arthritis and other inflammatory conditions could be helped by new insights into how the immune response is switched off.

Scientists have discovered how compounds produced by the body’s immune system help to dampen inflammation and prevent damage to healthy tissues.

Their findings suggest that therapies based on these compounds could help to treat rheumatoid arthritis, which occurs when the immune system attacks the joints, causing pain and swelling.

The research could also lead to new treatments for sepsis, where a body-wide immune response causes life-threatening tissue damage.

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Causes and Treatments of Common Shoulder Injuries

May 20th, 2016

shoulder injuries

The shoulder is a complex joint that facilitates the movement of the arm . Without this crucial joint, the most basic movements of the arm and hand would be impossible.

Think about the mobility that the shoulder affords the arm and hand. Although it is crucial for our daily activities, this movement often comes with a price as we age. Over time the shoulder joint can wear down causing increasing pain.

Due to the complexity of the joint, there are many categories that shoulder injuries fall under…

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Pediatric & Adult Hip Dysplasia

May 11th, 2016

hip dysplasia

The thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone – that’s what the song says. But sometimes that connection doesn’t work so well, which is the result of a hip socket that is too shallow – a condition known as hip dysplasia.

The hip is the largest “ball and socket” joint in the body, held together by ligaments, tendons and a joint capsule. The hip socket is designed to hold the femur tightly to prevent it from coming out of the socket while allowing enough motion to permit a wide variety of activities. Hip dysplasia simply means that the hip is in the wrong shape, most commonly, the hip socket is too shallow and not positioned to fully cover the femoral head.

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Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment for Orthopedics

April 26th, 2016

Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment

Invasive surgery and long recovery times for orthopedic surgery are becoming a thing of the past. After years of extensive surgeries and painful recovery times, surgeons are now looking towards new nonsurgical management of orthopedic issues. The current nonsurgical treatment that everybody is talking about is platelet-rich plasma, or PRP.

PRP is an autologous derivative of blood, which singles out high concentrations of platelets and is loaded with many growth factors and cytokines. While it is clear from the buzz that PRP can be useful for orthopedics, there is some debate as to the best use of PRP in the orthopedic world.

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Running subcuticular closure technique provides most perfusion to support wound closure after TKA

April 19th, 2016

subcuticular closure

Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of most commonly performed orthopedic surgeries in the U.S. A 2013 report in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery estimated 4 million adults were living with TKAs. Successful outcomes of TKA are linked to wound closure technique that supports optimal perfusion.

Despite consensus that this linkage exists, and multiple investigations to evaluate technique, no study has yet produced convincing data of a superior wound closure technique for optimizing perfusion — until now.

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How PRP Affects Soft-Tissue Injuries

April 13th, 2016

how prp affects soft-tissue injuries

The discussion about platelet-rich plasma, or PRP, treatment is becoming a more popular topic by the minute. PRP treatment is being proposed as an alternative to normal orthopedic treatments that tend to be costly for the wallet and for your time. In a previous blog we looked at PRP treatments’ ability to handle orthopedic difficulties like ACL reconstruction, fractures, and osteoarthritis. This time, let’s shift our focus to: how PRP affects soft-tissue injuries.

For the purpose of this analysis we will look at how PRP affects meniscal repair, rotator cuff repair, and tendon healing.

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First nationwide prevalence study of hip and knee arthroplasty

April 7th, 2016

joint arthroplasty

The orthopedic community and public are well aware that hip and knee replacement operations are among the most commonly performed operations in the U.S. Figures show around 1 million of these procedures are performed each year. But how many people actually are living with a hip or knee replacement in the United States?

This important measure of the impact of joint arthroplasty on public health, known as prevalence, has been missing until the recent release of the Mayo Clinic orthopedics study.

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Navigational and Conventional UKA: The differences

March 30th, 2016

Navigational and Conventional UKA

Arthritis is one of the top diseases that plagues the aging population; with osteoarthritis being the main assailant. Although sometimes mild, this disease can quickly turn into a painful menace that inhibits daily activities.

One type of osteoarthritis that often leads to meniscal disruption, ligament instability, or limb deformity is unicompartmental arthritis. This subset of arthritis affects only one compartment of the joint, and it usually attacks the articular cartilage in the medial or lateral part of the tibiofemoral joint.

When unicompartmental arthritis hits the advanced stages and surgery becomes necessary, patients have to choose between unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty. UKA has recently become the preferred method due to its 10-year survival rate of 95%.

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7 Signs You Should Stop Exercising Immediately

March 24th, 2016

Exhausted Runner

Ashley Langford​ is in tune with his body. The 40-year-old Web developer and ​photographer near Dallas, Texas, traded his party-hard lifestyle for intense exercise such as P90X and CrossFit in 2010. So when his heart rate “took off” from 140 to 180 beats per minute while on the rowing machine last year, he knew something was seriously wrong. But would you know the signs it’s time to ​stop exercising immediately and head straight to the hospital? 

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Computer or No Computer for Minimally Invasive Surgery

March 9th, 2016

computer vs no computer minimally invasive knee surgery

For a long time orthopedic surgeons have turned to the medial parapatellar approach for total knee arthroplasty. In other words, the most commonly used total knee replacement is often an invasive procedure that is coupled with long hospital stays and lengthy rehabilitation. However, this methodology is changing. In today’s world where people want better results faster, surgeons are now facing pressure to perform surgery using minimally invasive techniques.

The idea behind minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for total knee arthroplasty is that there will be less recovery time, shorter hospital stays, and smaller scars. However, there is some concern about the minimal visibility that comes with this type of surgery. The more conventional parapatellar surgery involves large incisions that give the surgeon maximum visibility. In comparison …

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Treatments that reduce knee buckling may help prevent falls in older adults

March 2nd, 2016

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Symptoms of knee instability in older adults may indicate an increased risk of falling and of experiencing the various physical and psychological effects that can result from falling, according to a study published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). The findings indicate that determining effective treatments for knee instability should be an important priority as clinicians care for aging patients.

Knee buckling, often described as a knee “giving way,” is a symptom of knee instability that frequently affects older individuals, in particular those with knee pain and knee osteoarthritis (OA), and may be caused by muscle weakness and balance difficulties. If knee instability leads to frequent falls and fall-related injuries, exercises and other interventions that stabilize the knee may help maintain older individuals’ health and quality of life.

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3 Secrets to Improving your Orthopedic Health

February 17th, 2016

orthopedic health

Thousands of people every day are starting out on a path towards a healthier lifestyle. This means that people are now more conscious about what they eat, and many people are trying out new types of exercise they would never have dreamed of before. While the goal here is to stay healthy and active, many people often forget that adding daily exercise to their lifestyle can take a toll on their body and orthopedic health.

As people become more active, the number of bone and joint injuries and chronic conditions continues to increase. This increase calls for a need to take care of our orthopedic health. Read about these few secrets that will help you improve your orthopedic health and ultimately avoid injury.

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Knee Replacements : Success Is Process Driven

February 10th, 2016

knee replacement success

Successful knee replacements can radically improve your quality of life. On the other hand, if your knee replacement does not go well, it will be a source of never ending frustration and disability. While many people do well, and some do exceptionally well, there are still a fair number of you out there who continue to have problems. What can be done to maximize your chances of success following a knee replacement? A successful, well functioning knee replacement will be the result of a reproducible process that should be relatively surgeon agnostic, as well as prosthetic agnostic. That means that there are many surgeons capable of getting you back on your feet. Many are right in your backyard. You shouldn’t succumb to the hype or feel the need to travel to Chicago and pay $60,000 for an ambulatory knee replacement.

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The Risks Of CrossFit Injury

February 3rd, 2016

Men with battle rope in functional training fitness gym

As CrossFit becomes more and more popular among exercise enthusiasts, many people are beginning to question the safety of the activity. Whether it is a CrossFit newbie or a seasoned veteran, everybody is beginning to wonder what their risk for injury could be.

The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine recently published an article that speaks directly about CrossFit injuries. The study was conducted based on surveys taken by CrossFit participants in Rochester, New York City, and Philadelphia. The survey asked a number of questions about CrossFit related injuries the participants had suffered over a 6-month period.

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Minimally Invasive Total Knee Replacement

January 27th, 2016

minimally invasive knee replacement

Minimally Invasive (MIS) knee replacement is a new technique which can significantly improve a patient’s rate of recovery from surgery. Dr. Stephen Kelly has been a leader in this field for OA Centers for Orthopaedics. He has successfully performed this procedure more than 500 times with significant improvements in patient’s pain after surgery and very rapid return to function. Knee replacement surgery traditionally has required a 10-12 inch incision with the cutting of muscle and tendon. This new minimally invasive technique involves …

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Safe Exercise

January 20th, 2016

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When people begin a new exercise program, they often push their bodies too far and put themselves at risk for injury. The common notion that exercise must be really hard or painful to be beneficial is simply wrong. Moderation is the key to safe exercise. Safe exercise programs start slowly and gradually build up in intensity, frequency, and duration. In addition, if you have an existing health problem, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, a history of heart disease, or are a smoker, you should contact your doctor before beginning any vigorous physical activity.

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5 Facts About Shoulder Injuries

January 13th, 2016

shoulder-impingement

Most people think joint problems are limited to serious athletes or older adults. But when it comes to the shoulder, everyone is at risk. Between the ages of 18 and 88, almost everyone will experience some kind of shoulder issue, according to Gregory Nicholson, MD, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in shoulder surgery at Rush University Medical Center. In fact, shoulders are the most commonly injured joints in the body. The unique and complex anatomy of the shoulder makes it …

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Researchers Design New Model to Identify Promising Candidates for Total Hip Replacement Surgery

January 8th, 2016

hip replacement

Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy have designed a new model to help doctors and patients decide whether or not to proceed with total hip replacement surgery. The researchers have also surveyed patient wellbeing after surgery: patients with high education achieve greater outcome scores, while those with antidepressant prescriptions do not.

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1.35 Million Youths a Year Suffer Serious Sports Injuries

December 30th, 2015

Youth_basketball_game

Occasional bumps and bruises are expected when kids play sports, but for more than 1.35 million children last year a sports-related injury was severe enough to send them to a hospital emergency department. Sprains and strains, fractures, contusions, abrasions and concussions top the list of sports-related ER diagnoses for kids ages 6 to 19 — at a cost of more than $935 million each year, according to a report out Tuesday from the non-profit advocacy group Safe Kids Worldwide.

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Graft Properties Affect Knee Ligament Surgery Outcome More Than Surgical Technique

December 23rd, 2015

ACL surgery

  In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, graft stiffness and pre-strain play a more vital role than the choice of surgical technique, indicates a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study developed a computational 3D model of the knee joint, which can be used in the prevention of osteoarthritis (OA), specifically OA resulting from trauma. OA is a major burden to society. It is estimated that over 100 million people suffer from …

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Playing Soccer or Handball During Puberty May Prevent Osteoporosis

December 18th, 2015

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Osteoporosis is a serious health issue that mainly affects postmenopausal women. Now, a Spanish study has confirmed that doing exercise during puberty can improve bone health in adulthood. In this scope, sports such as football, handball and basketball are better than others such as swimming. For years, osteoporosis has been referred to as the silent killer. It is characterised by a decrease in bone mass and an increase in the fragility of bones and the risk of fractures. It has been called the silent killer owing to …

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A New Approach to Hip Surgery

December 18th, 2015

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Larry Kufel had always been an active man, tall and rangy, who worked out regularly and picked up basketball games at the gym. But age was taking a toll on his joints, and it had become clear that he needed a hip replacement. “It got to the point, if I did any exertion, even getting out of a chair, it felt like the muscle was tearing away from the bone,” he recalled. Still, Mr. Kufel, 63, a financial controller in Roanoke, Va., worried that conventional hip replacement surgery would mean a long, painful recuperation. Instead, his doctor proposed an alternative …

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ACL Tears Are on the Rise in Kids

August 24th, 2015

ACL Tears are on the Rise in Kids

Once considered an adult injury, ACL tears are occurring more often in the legs of elementary and middle school-age children, orthopedic specialists report. The increase, which stems in part from better diagnostic tools and a dramatic increase in children playing competitive, organized sports, has created a vexing problem: What is the best way to fix it?

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Bad Knees: The Best Exercises to Prevent Further Injury

August 12th, 2015

best exercises to prevent further injury

When people have bad knees, whether they were athletes for several years, received a detrimental injury or have osteoarthritis, it can be a pain – literally. Aside from limiting your daily activity, it can also make staying in shape a lot harder. Consider these exercises to keep active with bad knees.

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Tips for Running After Hip Replacement

March 30th, 2015

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Runners rely on mobility when hitting the track or trail on any given day. Running is a high-impact activity that relies not only on your legs to move, but also your hips; and according to the American College of Sports Medicine, about 500,000 hip replacement surgeries occur yearly in the United States.

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Advances in Joint Replacement a Success!

March 17th, 2015

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Dr. Stickney and ProOrtho would like to thank everyone who attended the Advances in Joint Replacement Seminar last Thursday.  It was a great turnout and a lot people learned a great deal from Dr. Stickney’s information.  We hope to be able to provide more events like these in the future! 

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Sign up for Dr. Stickney’s Advances in Joint Replacement seminar on Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 7:00 pm

March 3rd, 2015

advances in joint replacement seminar

For more information, click here . For questions regarding this event, please call 425-216-7017 or email at ProOrthoFeedback@proliancesurgeons.com Click here to register for the event –Please indicate how many people will be attending.

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Early Signs of Osteoarthritis (OA) in the Knee

January 29th, 2015

early signs of osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common problem for many people after middle age. OA is sometimes referred to as degenerative, or wear and tear, arthritis. OA commonly affects the knee joint. In fact, knee OA is the most common cause of disability in the United States. In the past, people were led to believe that nothing could be done for their problem. Now doctors have many ways to treat knee OA so patients have less pain, better movement, and enhanced quality of life. According to a HealthDayNews report, “Having knee pain while using the stairs may be an early sign of arthritis.” A study conducted at the University of Leeds included more than 4,600 people who were at high risk for arthritis. Researchers followed the volunteers for up to seven years. Professor Philip Conaghan, a professor of musculoskeletal medicine at the University of Leeds in England stated in a news release, “At present, we have little concept of ‘early’ osteoarthritis and often only see people when they have significant, longstanding pain and loss of function.” He goes on to say, “This research is vital to understanding early symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.” Using stairs was the first weight-bearing activity in which people […]

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Knee Problems Associated with Snowshoeing

November 18th, 2014

Enjoying the beauty of the Pacific Northwest on snowshoes is a great way to see the “country” on a beautiful winter day.

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Join Dr. Stickney In Presenting Advances in Joint Replacement

November 3rd, 2014

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Please join  Dr.  Jeff Stickney, Dr. Craig McAllister, and Dr. Robin Fuchs as they talk in depth about the latest advances in Outpatient Joint Replacement Surgeries.  Topics to be discussed include: Outpatient Joint Replacement Surgery MIS/Navigated Hip & Knee Replacements Upcoming Study in Pain Management and Rapid Rehabilitation Event Information: Dates: Thursday, November 13, 2014 Wednesday, January 21, 2015 Thursday, March 12, 2015 Time:  7:00 pm Featured Speakers:  Dr. Craig McAllister, Dr. Robin Fuchs, and Dr. Jeff Stickney Location: ProOrtho 12911 120th Ave NE Suite H210 Kirkland, WA 98034 For questions regarding this event, please call 425-216-7017 or email at ProOrthoFeedback@proliancesurgeons.com Click here to register for the event –Please indicate how many people will be attending.   Read more about Advances in Hip Replacement Surgery with Minimally Invasive Techniques by Dr. Jeff Stickney Read more about Advances In Joint Replacement by Dr. Craig McAllister. Dr. McAllister was also featured on local news discussing minimally invasive joint surgery. Watch videoRead more about Outpatient Knee Replacement by Dr. Robin Fuchs  

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The Throwing Arm of a Baseball Pitcher – Understanding Shoulder Pain

October 20th, 2014

shoulder injures in baseball players

Shoulder pain, particularly related to throwing sports such as baseball, involves the rotator cuff. You may have heard a variety of medical terms related to the shoulder, like rotator cuff tendinitis, rotator cuff tear, or impingement syndrome. But what does this mean to a baseball athlete?

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Knee Pain? Learn about Knee Tendinitis

September 22nd, 2014

Consider this statement, “Many people who participate in sports or fitness activities will get tendinitis at one time or another.” If you’re an avid athlete or fitness enthusiast like myself, chances are you have felt the discomfort of pain in your knees. What is tendinitis? Tendinitis is a persistent inflammation in the tendons. Typically in the knee, this involves the patella tendon between the kneecap and the tibia bone or the quadriceps tendon between the quadriceps muscle and the kneecap. The illiotibial band and the hamstring tendons can develop tendonitis as well. Injuries that do not adequately heal result in persistent inflammation and scar formation. Overuse is a common risk factor for tendinitis. When the tendon is stretched repeatedly by doing the same kind of exercise over a long period of time, the tendon can become strained and inflamed. Runners often get tendinitis for this reason. Tendinitis can also be caused by intense exercise over a short period of time.  For example, exercising all weekend to make up for the lack of physical exercise during the week. As we age our tendons become more brittle which makes our knees more vulnerable to stress and strain. Tendinitis is usually treated with therapy, […]

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Hip Replacement – Performing the Anterior Approach

September 3rd, 2014

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Considering a hip replacement is no easy decision. There are various procedures in the orthopedic marketplace. There are 3 common approaches to the hip replacement. The Posterior Approach is the most common traditional approach. The lateral approach has a lower dislocation risk but a much higher incidence of limp after surgery. I have been performing the anterior approach for total hip replacement for years. In fact, I am the only orthopedic surgeon in Kirkland, WA that performs this procedure. How does the anterior approach to total hip replacement differ from the traditional hip replacement surgery? For one, the anterior approach is a tissue-sparing alternative. The approach to the hip from the front does not involve cutting any major structures to get to the hip. Instead, the interval between two muscles is separated, leading to the hip capsule. I work between your muscles and tissues without detaching them from either the pelvis or thighbones – sparing the tissue from trauma. The Traditional posterior approach from the back requires dividing the gluteus maximus (butt) muscle and splitting part of the ilio-tibial band on the side of the hip and then cutting several small tendons off the back of the hip. Many surgeons […]

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Dr. Jeff Stickney Recognized as 2014 Top Doctors by Seattle Met Magazine

August 20th, 2014

Congratulations Dr. Stickney for being recognized as a “Top Doctor of Seattle” by Seattle Met Magazine!   According to Seattle Met Magazine, “The panel’s criteria to select the finalists included a provider’s years of experience and competency within his or her specialty, rapport with patients, including patient satisfaction and compliance with care recommendations, and ability to work effectively with colleagues across specialties to deliver the best care for patients.” Dr. Jeff Stickney practices in Kirkland Washington. He subspecializes in sports medicine and joint reconstruction. He is board certified in orthopedic surgery and specialty board certified in sports medicine. His primary interest is in knee, hip, and shoulder problems. His joint replacement practice emphasizes minimally invasive procedures and computer guided navigation in knee replacements. He was educated at the University of South Florida and The University of Washington. Visit Dr. Stickney’s web site at www.stickneymd.com or call and schedule an appointment at 425-823-4000.  You can also email him at ProOrthoAppointment@proliancesurgeons.com.

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Common Weightlifting Injuries

August 14th, 2014

Weight lifting is a sport as well as part of someone’s exercise regimen.  Experienced weight lifters rarely suffer serious injuries but newcomers to the sport or exercise are more prone to musculoskeletal injuries.   Distal biceps rupture: This is a rupture of the biceps tendon that attaches the biceps muscle in the arm to a bone of the upper forearm. A weightlifter can rupture this tendon at the elbow with a sudden force that extends the elbow while trying to contract the biceps. Performing a biceps curl and then losing control of the weight is an example. Surgery to reattach the tendon is usually needed. Choosing a weight that a person can lift and control can help prevent a distal biceps rupture.   Labral tear: The labrum is a cartilage bumper in the shoulder that surrounds the glenoid (socket). With repetitive compression of the labrum or possibly an acute motion that injures the shoulder, the weightlifter can feel discomfort or a clicking sensation deep within the shoulder. An orthopedic surgeon can perform a physical exam and tests that suggest a labral tear. An MRI with contrast injected (MR arthrogram) can demonstrate a tear. Surgery is often required to treat a […]

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Housemaid’s Knee (Prepatellar Bursitis) – Know the Signs and Symptoms

August 4th, 2014

Housemaid’s knee is also known as prepatellar bursitis. It is caused by inflammation of the bursa (a small fluid-filled sac) in front of the kneecap. It more commonly occurs in people who spend long periods of time kneeling. Housemaid’s knee is more common in tradesmen who spend long periods of time kneeling -for example, carpet fitters, concrete finishers and roofers. Any age group can be affected by housemaid’s knee. It is generally more common in males than in females. Housemaid’s knee in children is more likely to be caused by infection. Infection is also a common cause of housemaid’s knee in people whose immune systems are not working normally; people include those receiving steroid treatment or those on chemotherapy treatment for cancer. What is bursitis? Bursitis means inflammation within a bursa. A bursa is a small sac of fluid with a thin lining. There are a number of bursae in the body. Bursae are normally found around joints and in places where ligaments and tendons pass over bones. They can also be found in other places if there has been unusual pressure or friction placed on that area. Generally, the function of a bursa is to help reduce friction and […]

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Jeff Stickney, M.D. Launches Web Site

July 2nd, 2014

Dr. Stickney is pleased to announce the launch of his web site, www.stickneymd.com. Staying true to his commitment of helping everyone stay healthy, active, fit and free of injury, Dr. Stickney hopes that by launching his site, patients and people suffering from pain and injury are able to determine their next course of action when faced with an orthopedic injury.

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ACL Prevention and Treatment

July 1st, 2014

ACL prevention and treatment

Spring is the perfect time to get outdoors to play tennis, basketball, soccer or even take up running. Being active requires our bodies to adjust to the season once again and the providers at ProOrtho want to make sure that you are not sidelined from enjoying your favorite outdoor activity this season

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Orthopedic Injuries Related to Spring and Tips to Avoid Injury

July 1st, 2014

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When the rain showers subside here in the Pacific Northwest, we all love to take advantage of the great outdoors. Cleaning the rain gutters, mowing the lawn, moving furniture or gardening may present injuries. Let’s face it, when the sun comes out, we want to do everything outside

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ProOrtho Physicians Recognized as 2014 Top Doctors by Seattle Magazine

July 1st, 2014

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According to Seattle Magazine, “We asked thousands of local doctors this question: To whom would you send a loved one for medical care? And more than 1,300 doctors participated, with nearly 13,000 nominations, to create this list of 437 physicians judged to be at the top in their field.” The Awards Ceremony will be held June 26, 2014

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