Category Archives: Knee

The Link Between Distance Running and Arthritis

marathonAlthough distance running is often associated with numerous health benefits, the impact on hip and knee joint health has been inconclusive up to this point. Long-distance running has been linked with an increased prevalence of arthritis in some studies, but others have shown an inverse association or no association at all.

In a recent study published by Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, authors Ponzio et al. investigate hip and knee health in active marathon runners, including the prevalence of pain, arthritis and arthroplasty and associated risk factors.

To conduct their research, Ponzio et al. distributed a hip and knee health survey internationally to marathon runners from 18-79 years old, divided into subgroups by age, sex BMI and physical activity level. The survey questions assessed pain, personal and family history of arthritis, surgical history, running volume, personal record time, risk factors and current running status. The results were then compared with National Center for Health Statistics’ information for a matched group of the US population who were not marathon runners.

What the authors of the study found is that while age, family history and surgical history independently predicted an increased risk for hip and knee arthritis in active marathoners, there was no correlation with running history. In the researcher’s cohort study, the arthritis rate of active marathoners was below that of the general US population.

While the authors conclude that longitudinal follow-up is needed to determine the effects of marathon running on developing future knee and hip arthritis, it’s a hopeful and encouraging finding for long-distance runners.

Dr. Stickney, a Kirkland orthopedic surgeon, is an expert in joint replacement surgerysports medicine and more. Contact Dr. Stickney and return to your healthy, pain-free lifestyle!

PRP Injections May Be the Answer to Osteoarthritis

PRP-and-the-kneeAlthough osteoarthritis is one of the most common chronic joint conditions, few nonsurgical options have shown long-term benefits. Impacting almost 27 million Americans, the disease causes pain, swelling, and mobility issues as the cartilage between joints wears down. Joint replacement surgery can provide relief once the disease has significantly progressed, but nonsurgical alternatives have only had short-term benefits. Now, a new study published in The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery suggests that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) injections could combat pain and improve joint functioning in the knee.

In the past, nonsurgical treatments have included using anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid (HA) injections. While they ease discomfort, research hasn’t found that the conditions are improved over a longer length of time, necessitating total knee replacement surgery. PRP, however, might offer a new solution.

PRP is blood plasma infused with platelets and contains several different growth factors. It’s been used to help alleviate pain from damaged muscles, ligaments, tendons, and joints by healing damaged cells and promote formation of cartilage repair tissue. Until now, no tests about its efficacy have been conclusive, partly due to small sample sizes. To make a more definitive claim, researchers from The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University conducted 10 randomized controlled trails with 1,069 patients.

562 patients received PRP injections to their knees, 429 received HA injections, and 78 received saline injections. Studies had three month, six month, and 12 month follow-ups. Although at six months, relevant studies showed no difference in pain or function scores, at one year, the researchers found that PRP was significantly more effective than HA at relieving pain and improving function.

Researchers were concerned that the proinflammatory substances PRP releases could be detrimental to tissues. However, no tissue damage was reported at either the six or 12 month follow-up and there were no differences in adverse effects between PRP and HA. More research will be needed before this can be confirmed.

Overall, these results show that PRP could be a viable nonsurgical option for patients with OA, helping regenerate tissue and stimulate HA production over a longer period of time.

Is knee pain impacting your quality of life? Dr. Stickney, a Kirkland orthopedic surgeon specializing in procedures including total knee replacement, can help you determine what surgical or non-surgical options are best for you. Contact his office today to learn more.