Category Archives: Injuries

The Risks Of CrossFit Injury

As CrossFit becomes more and more popular among exercise enthusiasts, many people are beginning to question the safety of the activity. Whether it is a CrossFit newbie or a seasoned veteran, everybody is beginning to wonder what their risk for injury could be.

As CrossFit becomes more and more popular among exercise enthusiasts, many people are beginning to question the safety of the activity. Whether it is a CrossFit newbie or a seasoned veteran, everybody is beginning to wonder what their risk for injury could be.

The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine recently published an article that speaks directly about CrossFit injuries. The study was conducted based on surveys taken by CrossFit participants in Rochester, New York City, and Philadelphia. The survey asked a number of questions about CrossFit related injuries the participants had suffered over a 6-month period.

The Statistics

  • Only 19.4% of the survey participants suffered an injury in the 6-month period
  • Female participants had a significantly lower rate of injury than males
  • Injury locations included: shoulder, lower back, and knees
  • Many different age groups experienced injuries, so this factor had no significant impact
  • No difference was found based on length of the training sessions
  • There was no difference in injuries based on the amount of time a participant had been doing CrossFit
  • The level of coach supervision had a LARGE impact on injury rates.

CrossFit injury conclusions

Based on the statistics above, it seems that the number of CrossFit injuries is fairly low. It is important to note that these statistics are based on significant injuries only, so things like small aches and pains are not counted.

So, we can conclude that CrossFit is no more dangerous than other activities. Although there are many different types of exercises that a participant does during a CrossFit workout, it seems that this variation does not cause more injuries than other types of exercise. In fact, some may argue that the strength training of many different muscles in the body is actually highly beneficial for muscle strength and health.

However, more comparative research must be done before any solid conclusions can be made about how CrossFit injuries compare to injuries from other forms of exercise.

Ways to decrease your risk of CrossFit injury

Based on the statistics above, there is one obvious parameter that kept people from getting injured while doing CrossFit: having a coach present. It is clear that having a coach attentively watching, as you complete CrossFit workouts, will greatly reduce your risk of injury.

Coaches are knowledgeable about how to complete each workout they direct participants to do, and thus they can adjust your form, reps, or the amount of weight you are using if they feel it is too dangerous. Coaches can also modify workouts based on a participants’ injury history or current areas of pain. Because a coaches’ involvement is crucial in avoiding injury, you should consider the involvement of the resident coaches when choosing a CrossFit gym.

Also, never be afraid to ask for help when you are unsure about a CrossFit activity. The coaches are there to help you get the most out of your workout, and also to make sure you stay safe and injury free!

So if you are interested in the world of CrossFit, get out there and try it! Go slow at first and make sure to ask for the coaches’ help. Who knows, CrossFit may become your new favorite activity.

 

References: Weisenthal BM, Beck CA, Maloney MD, DeHaven KE, Giordano BD. Injury rate and patterns among CrossFit athletes. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014;2(4).

Safe Exercise

When people begin a new exercise program, they often push their bodies too far and put themselves at risk for injury. The common notion that exercise must be really hard or painful to be beneficial is simply wrong. Moderation is the key to safe exercise. Safe exercise programs start slowly and gradually build up in intensity, frequency, and duration.

In addition, if you have an existing health problem, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, a history of heart disease, or are a smoker, you should contact your doctor before beginning any vigorous physical activity.

5 Facts About Shoulder Injuries

Most people think joint problems are limited to serious athletes or older adults. But when it comes to the shoulder, everyone is at risk.

Between the ages of 18 and 88, almost everyone will experience some kind of shoulder issue, according to Gregory Nicholson, MD, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in shoulder surgery at Rush University Medical Center.

In fact, shoulders are the most commonly injured joints in the body. The unique and complex anatomy of the shoulder makes it …

1.35 Million Youths a Year Suffer Serious Sports Injuries

Occasional bumps and bruises are expected when kids play sports, but for more than 1.35 million children last year a sports-related injury was severe enough to send them to a hospital emergency department.

Sprains and strains, fractures, contusions, abrasions and concussions top the list of sports-related ER diagnoses for kids ages 6 to 19 — at a cost of more than $935 million each year, according to a report out Tuesday from the non-profit advocacy group Safe Kids Worldwide.

ACL Tears Are on the Rise in Kids

ACL Tears are on the Rise in KidsOnce considered an adult injury, ACL tears are occurring more often in the legs of elementary and middle school-age children, orthopedic specialists report. The increase, which stems in part from better diagnostic tools and a dramatic increase in children playing competitive, organized sports, has created a vexing problem: What is the best way to fix it?

For years, doctors have advised delaying surgery until the bones are finished growing, usually around age 14 for girls and 16 for boys. In the meantime, children were prescribed physical therapy and encouraged to remain active while using a knee brace, with the exception of cutting, pivoting and contact sports.

But postponing surgery hasn’t worked very well, in part because it’s difficult to keep children from further damaging the knee while they wait, In some cases for years. Athletic youngsters often must stop playing sports they love, a loss that can lead to depression and affect a child’s identity and friendships.

The ACL, which connects the thigh bones and shinbones inside the knee joint, is a crucial stabilizer during sports like basketball, football, soccer and lacrosse. Its job is to protect the knee from shifting, rotating and hyperextending as an athlete runs, jumps or lands. An easy way to tear the ligament involves simultaneously decelerating and twisting.

In adults, surgery is not always necessary, especially for those with sedentary lifestyles. Though skiing and soccer might be out, it is possible to walk, run and even play tennis with a fully torn ACL.

Risks are higher for children because it is hard to get them to modify their activity. A study published last year in The American Journal of Sports Medicine found that young athletes who delay surgery five months or more have a higher chance of suffering a secondary knee injury. Waiting can lead to progressive damage to other parts of the knee, including the meniscus and cartilage, multiple studies show.

Though official statistics are scarce, orthopedic specialists estimate that thousands of children and teens are tearing their ACLs each year. Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia found a 400 percent increase in youth ACL injuries over the last decade, according to findings presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2011 annual meeting. Girls have up to eight times the risk of an ACL tear as boys; though no one knows exactly why.

Dr. Stickney specializes in hip, knee and shoulder surgery in his Kirkland and Redmond locations. If you are experiencing knee issues or have questions about treatment options, contact our office to schedule your next appointment! Watch Dr. Stickney’s video and learn more about orthopedic surgery.

Bad Knees: The Best Exercises to Prevent Further Injury

When people have bad knees, whether they were athletes for several years, received a detrimental injury or have osteoarthritis, it can be a pain – literally. Aside from limiting your daily activity, it can also make staying in shape a lot harder. Consider these exercises to keep active with bad knees.

Common mistakes

best exercises to prevent further injuryWhen people with bad knees exercise, they often make a few mistakes along the way. First off, many people try several different cardio exercises, which is not always a good idea. Only certain knee exercises can help burn calories without putting people in pain. When some do knee exercises, they may bend their knees past the front of their toes. This can aggravate knee joints and make orthopedic problems worse. This is because it puts intense pressure beneath the kneecap, stressing the muscles around it. People sometimes start to perform exercises that their knees cannot handle because they did not ask their doctor first, putting them in danger. Knowing knee strength and capability is crucial before starting any kind of exercise regimen.

Beneficial Knee Exercises

Think about trying out these activities at the gym to get a workout in. Complete these exercises in 10 or more repetitions.

Partial Squats – Many people know that regular squats can put bad knees in a lot of pain. However, partial squats can burn calories without aggravating the knee muscles. People begin this exercise similar to regular squats, with their feet hip-width apart. Slowly lower the body, making sure that the toes do not go past the knees. People should only go as low as is comfortable.

Step-Ups – Step-ups can help work the hamstrings, quads and gluteus muscles and strengthen knee muscles if done correctly. People can use an anaerobic step or a step on a staircase for this activity. Step up on one foot, tapping the other at the edge of the stair. Step down and switch. As with partial squats, the knee should not bend over the toes.

Calf Raises – This exercise strengthens the foot, ankle and calf muscles. Stand up with both feet pointed forward. Raise the heels off the ground slowly and then lower them again, making sure to keep the heels in sync. Going slowly makes the workout harder. If people have difficulty staying balanced, they can use a wall or chair for stability.

Hamstring Stretch – This activity helps promote circulation and prevents muscle injuries. People should begin by lying on their back with one leg straight out. Keeping the other leg straight, they should wrap a towel around the foot and pull the leg toward them, making sure that the knee does not lock.

Dr. Stickney specializes in hip, knee and shoulder surgery in his Kirkland and Redmond locations. If you are experiencing knee issues or have questions about your treatment options, contact our office to schedule your next appointment! Watch Dr. Stickney’s video and learn more about orthopedic surgery.